About us Premier Boxing Organisation

The Premier Boxing Rankings started out in late 1991 and took over a years sorting to finally get a top 100 together in each division. The basic idea with the rankings is that they are based on the man who beat the man who beat the man. We ran the publication until October 1998 and it was sent to almost every corner of the world to boxers, managers, promoters, tv companies on a subscription basis, they were the industry leader as recognised as the bible by most managers and promoters. In late 1998 we agreed to licence the rankings to the International Boxing Organisation and we worked with them until February 1st 2014. The principles have never changed that we list the fighters in order of factual achievements, the ratings are the most accurate available to the true positions of how they have fought against other boxers. There will be young hungry fighters on the way up that subjectively should be ranked higher and vice versa older fighters in decline, no objective ranking could factor that and that is the skill of the matchmaker to look for higher rated opponents that his man could beat.

When we started out with our initial database we realised something quite strange, people in the top 50 rarely faced each other. Most boxer’s records until they fight for titles are based primarily on feasting on other debutants, no hopers and journeyman. It seemed a constant pattern that fighters were 20-0 and had not fought anybody in the top 100. That was in 1992 and 22 later it is still the same. All of the sanctioning bodies have at some time allowed a man to fight for the world title without him having fought anyone in our top 100 and many boxers have lofty ratings for no objective reason.

Of course you may say that our top 100 is wrong. We can only defend that ours are based on facts and the results that have happened since 1992 rather than a view of somebody or indeed an amateur record. Each fighter has a value once he has fought. The lowest value is zero for someone without a win. A win against an unranked fighter is worth 1 point or 2 points depending on the method of victory, points or stoppage. We maintain each division down to 30 points, so you could scrape into the top 200 with totally meaningless wins against lets say moderate opponents, but you won’t go much higher unless you up your opponent quality. Your ranking in one division does not equal the same in another division and sometimes you can move up in the rankings without fighting and sometimes winning a fight will not generate enough points and you could go down, it is often about the performance of other boxers that can determine the position.

We never really know how good an unbeaten fighter is until he matches up with someone who we have some qualified knowledge on. A promoter will look to make his fighter a champion or find the easiest route to that opportunity.

The ratings may look a molodge of numbers but they carry the detail and reasoning behind the ups and the downs. A brief explanation of how to understand them is below;

The first five columns show the latest ratings we have from the WBC, WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO.
The next column shows the current Independent rating of the boxer.
The next column shows the position last month of that boxer.
The next column shows the best ever position (his all time high) of the boxer. An asterisk before shows that position was in a higher weight class and an asterisk afterwards shows that position was obtained in a lower weight class.
The next two columns show the boxers name as we have him.
The next column shows the boxers nationality.
The next column shows the boxers age.
The next column shows the boxers current titles or former ones. We can’t list everything and opt to post the best title, where he is a multiple belt holder.
The next six columns show the boxers last six fights, the right hand side is the most recent. Wins, Draws, Losses or No-contests are shown. Wins are shown in two forms, a W is a win against a non top 100 fighter and the number shows a Win with the number representing the ranking of the opponent at the time of the fight. A + sign means we have factored in the opinion of the press who scored the fight significantly different to the judging and recorded result.
The next series of columns relate to compliance.

The Association of Boxing Commissions in 1997 made a series of recommendations that a fighter in order to retain his ranking should make a compliant fight within 18 months. They suggested that fighters in the top 10 should fight against one in the top 15 in a rolling 18 month period.

Primarily a fighter in the first 35 ranks must engage in the first 50 ranks in a rolling 18 month period in order to be compliant. We also have added a further series of compliance relating up to a 36 month period to stop unworthy fighters maintaining a high rating position by doing nothing.

We feel this is an essential part of a good ranking system and promotes top quality fights for the good of boxing. As OUR ratings include all champions and that the main five sanctioning bodies top 15. Broadly that means 35 boxers rated by the Premier Boxing Rankings, our compliance rules read as this:

A fighter in the first 35 ranks shall box another in the first 50 ranks in a rolling 18 month period in order to be compliant.
A fighter in the first 50 ranks shall have beaten another in the first 100 ranks within the last 36 month period in order to be compliant.
A fighter in the first 35 ranks shall have beaten another in the first 100 ranks within the last 24 month period in order to be compliant.
A fighter in the first 20 ranks shall have beaten another in the first 50 ranks within the last 18 month period in order to be compliant.
A fighter in the first 10 ranks shall have beaten another in the first 50 ranks within the last 12 month period in order to be compliant. If he has a defeat he must have beaten a top 50 fighter within the last 18 months.
A fighter in the first 50 ranks shall have beaten another in the first 100 ranks.

Points are reduced or a monthly basis until a fighter lies in a zone where he is the compliant.

The first of the compliance columns shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has ever defeated. The L36 column shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has defeated over the last 3 years. The L30 column shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has defeated over the last 30 months. The L24 column shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has defeated over the last two years. The L18 column shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has defeated over the last 18 months. The L12 column shows the highest ranked fighter that the boxer has defeated over the last year. All columns will read the same if the boxers best performance was within the last year.

The next column shows the date of the boxers last fight.
The next column shows the record of the boxer in wins-draws-losses.
The next column shows the amount of knockouts.
The next column shows the amount of defeats by stoppage.
The next column shows the record of the boxer if we only take into account of the boxers performance against top 50 fighters.
The final column shows who manages the boxer (this has to be paid for) or shows if the fighter is not compliant.

A monthly PDF subscription sent to your email will cost $19 per year. (sent mid-monthly as up to a top 200)
A manager who wants to add his contact details to his boxers will pay $10 per boxer per year, up to a maximum of $49 per year for multiple boxers, this will be added to the notes column.